Keynote Speakers

Yonina Eldar

Recovering lost information in analog-to-digital conversion

Abstract:
The famous Shannon-Nyquist theorem has become a landmark in analog to digital conversion and the development of digital signal processing algorithms. However, in many modern applications, the signal bandwidths have increased tremendously, while the acquisition capabilities have not scaled sufficiently fast. Furthermore, the resulting high rate digital data requires storage, communication and processing at very high rates which is computationally expensive and requires large amounts of power. In the context of medical imaging sampling at high rates often translates to high radiation dosages, increased scanning times, bulky medical devices, and limited resolution. In this talk we consider a general framework for sub-Nyquist sampling and processing in space, time and frequency which allows to dramatically reduce the number of antennas, sampling rates and band occupancy in a variety of applications. Our framework relies on exploiting signal structure and the processing task. We consider applications of these ideas to a variety of problems in communications, radar and ultrasound imaging and show several demos of real-time sub-Nyquist prototypes including a wireless ultrasound probe, sub-Nyquist MIMO radar, cognitive radio, shared spectrum radar, and an analog combiner prototype. We then show how these ideas can be used to overcome fundamental resolution limits in optical microscopy and ultrasound imaging and demonstrate sub-Nyquist devices operating beyond the standard resolution limits combining high spatial resolution with short integration time.

Bio:
Yonina Eldar is a Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the Technion?Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, where she holds the Edwards Chair in Engineering. She is also a Research Affiliate with the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT and a Visiting Professor at Duke University, and was a Visiting Professor at Stanford University. She received the B.Sc. degree in physics and the B.Sc. degree in electrical engineering both from Tel-Aviv University (TAU), Tel-Aviv, Israel, in 1995 and 1996, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, in 2002. She is a member of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, an IEEE Fellow and a EURASIP Fellow. She has received many awards for excellence in research and teaching, including the IEEE Signal Processing Society Technical Achievement Award (2013), the IEEE/AESS Fred Nathanson Memorial Radar Award (2014) and the IEEE Kiyo Tomiyasu Award (2016). She was a Horev Fellow of the Leaders in Science and Technology program at the Technion and an Alon Fellow. She received the Michael Bruno Memorial Award from the Rothschild Foundation, the Weizmann Prize for Exact Sciences, the Wolf Foundation Krill Prize for Excellence in Scientific Research, the Henry Taub Prize for Excellence in Research (twice), the Hershel Rich Innovation Award (three times), the Award for Women with Distinguished Contributions, the Andre and Bella Meyer Lectureship, the Career Development Chair at the Technion, the Muriel & David Jacknow Award for Excellence in Teaching, and the Technion?s Award for Excellence in Teaching (two times). She received several best paper awards and best demo awards together with her research students and colleagues, was selected as one of the 50 most influential women in Israel, and was a member of the Israel Committee for Higher Education. She is the Editor in Chief of Foundations and Trends in Signal Processing and a member of several IEEE Technical Committees and Award Committees.

Nikos Sidiropoulos

Abstract:

Bio:
Nikos Sidiropoulos earned the Diploma in Electrical Engineering from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of Maryland at College Park, in 1988, 1990 and 1992, respectively. He has served on the faculty of the University of Virginia, University of Minnesota, and the Technical University of Crete, Greece, prior to his current appointment as Louis T. Rader Professor and Chair of ECE at UVA. From 2015 to 2017 he was an ADC Chair Professor at the University of Minnesota. His research interests are in signal processing, communications, optimization, tensor decomposition, and factor analysis, with applications in machine learning and communications. He received the NSF/CAREER award in 1998, the IEEE Signal Processing Society (SPS) Best Paper Award in 2001, 2007, and 2011, served as IEEE SPS Distinguished Lecturer (2008-2009), and currently serves as Vice President - Membership of IEEE SPS. He received the 2010 IEEE Signal Processing Society Meritorious Service Award, and the 2013 Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of Maryland, Dept. of ECE. He is a Fellow of IEEE (2009) and a Fellow of EURASIP (2014).

Rui Zhang

Abstract:

Bio:
Dr. Rui Zhang (Fellow, IEEE) received the Ph.D. degree from Stanford University in electrical engineering. He is now a Dean?s Chair Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore. His research interests include wireless information and power transfer, UAV communication, MIMO, cognitive radio, and optimization methods. He has published over 300 papers, which have been cited more than 23,000 times. He has been listed as a Highly Cited Researcher by Thomson Reuters/Clarivate Analytics since 2015. His works have received several IEEE awards, including the IEEE Marconi Prize Paper Award in Wireless Communications, the IEEE Communications Society Heinrich Hertz Prize Paper Award, the IEEE Signal Processing Society Best Paper Award, Young Author Best Paper Award, and Donald G. Fink Overview Paper Award. He has served as an Editor for several IEEE journals, including TWC, TCOM, JSAC, TSP, etc., and as TPC co-chair or organizing committee member for over 30 international conferences.

Petar Popovski

Abstract:

Bio:
Petar Popovski is a Professor of Wireless Communications with Aalborg University. He received his Dipl. Ing and Magister Ing. degrees in communication engineering from the University of Sts. Cyril and Methodius in Skopje and the Ph.D. degree from Aalborg University in 2005. He has over 300 publications in journals, conference proceedings, and edited books. He holds over 30 patents and patent applications. He is a Fellow of IEEE. He received an ERC Consolidator Grant (2015), the Danish Elite Researcher award (2016), IEEE Fred W. Ellersick prize (2016) and IEEE Stephen O. Rice prize (2018). He is currently a Steering Committee Member of IEEE SmartGridComm and previously served as a Steering Committee Member of the IEEE INTERNET OF THINGS JOURNAL. He is currently an Area Editor of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS. His research interests are in the area of wireless communication and networking, and communication/information theory.

Reinaldo A. Valenzuela

Abstract:

Bio:
Member National Academy of Engineering, Fellow IEEE. IEEE Eric E. Sumner Award. Bell Labs Fellow. WWRF Fellow, 2014 IEEE CTTC Technical Achievement Award, 2015 IEEE VTS Avant Garde Award. B.Sc. U. of Chile, Ph.D. Imperial College. Director, Communication Theory Department, Distinguished Member of Technical Staff, Bell Laboratories. Engaged in propagation measurements and models, MIMO/space time systems achieving high capacities using transmit and receive antenna arrays, HetNets, small cells and next generation air interface techniques and architectures. He has published 190 papers and 44 patents. He has over 28,000 Google Scholar citations and is a 'Highly Cited Author' In Thomson ISI and a Fulbright Senior Specialist.